Archive for Tuesday, October 1, 2013

Lions Club members test for young vision problems in the blink of an eye

Baldwin City Lions Club member Sheryl Cleverley takes an infrared scan of 4-year-old Rylee Webb's eyes while her twin sister, Jordan, watches last week at the Baldwin Elementary School Primary Center. Cleverley and Baldwin City Lions Club President Mike Gammage tested the vision of 158 children of kindergarten age and younger at the school with the device for vision problems.

Baldwin City Lions Club member Sheryl Cleverley takes an infrared scan of 4-year-old Rylee Webb's eyes while her twin sister, Jordan, watches last week at the Baldwin Elementary School Primary Center. Cleverley and Baldwin City Lions Club President Mike Gammage tested the vision of 158 children of kindergarten age and younger at the school with the device for vision problems.

October 1, 2013

Four-year-old twins Rylee and Jordan Webb weren’t fidgety during their eye exams last week at Baldwin Elementary School Primary Center, but it wouldn’t have mattered if they were.

Holding a device that looked much like a digital camera, Baldwin City Lions Club member Sheryl Cleverley took an infrared digital scan of the twins’ eyes in just a blink. Less than a minute after Rylee’s scan, Club President Mike Gammage printed out a report on her vision.

“She’s fine,” he said.

The report listed as “in range” Rylee’s nearsightedness, farsightedness, astigmatism, pupil size deviation and eye alignment. A space for “potential conditions” was blank.

He and Cleverley were visiting the school with the PediaVision Spot Vision Camera that District 8 of the Kansas Lions Club purchased for school screenings of young students, Gammage said.

The device is being taken to elementary schools to test children too young to take traditional vision screening exams, which involve identifying letters or objects, Baldwin school district nurse Carrie Enick said.

The technology is also much faster than traditional methods, Enick said. In two visits to the school last week, Cleverley and Gammage screened 158 children from the age of 3 months through kindergarten, she said. Of those, 12 tested out of range for various conditions. Their parents were given printouts and encouraged to make follow-up appointments with optometrists for further testing.

“It’s a pretty amazing machine,” Enick said. “I am anxious to get some feedback from doctors as those students follow up.”

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