Archive for Thursday, April 15, 2010

Tea party rally draws thousands in support of lowering taxes

Thousands of people attended a tea party rally Thursday, April 15 at CommunityAmerica ballpark in Wyandotte County.

Thousands of people attended a tea party rally Thursday, April 15 at CommunityAmerica ballpark in Wyandotte County.

April 15, 2010

Tea party rally speaker — Patricia Lightner

Patricia Lightner, candidate for Kansas’ 3rd Congressional District, speaks Thursday, April 15 during a tea party rally at CommunityAmerica ballpark in Wyandotte County. Enlarge video

Tea party rally speaker — John Rysavy

John Rysavy, candidate for Kansas’ 3rd Congressional District, speaks Thursday, April 15 during a tea party rally at CommunityAmerica ballpark in Wyandotte County. Enlarge video

Tea party rally speaker — Kevin Yoder

Kevin Yoder, candidate for Kansas’ 3rd Congressional District, speaks Thursday, April 15 during a tea party rally at CommunityAmerica ballpark in Wyandotte County. Enlarge video

— “Freedom.”

That’s the only reason Larry Pettus, of Kansas City, Mo., needed for attending a tea party rally Thursday, April 15, at CommunityAmerica Ballpark in Wyandotte County.

“I’m here for freedom. I don’t want to watch our country go down the tube,” Pettus said. “I just hope this gets people fired up.”

Pettus was one of thousands of people who attended the rally, which was sponsored by the Kansas City area tea party-related group Political Chips, to show their frustrations with the federal government and their support for lowering taxes.

The rally, which coincided with the annual deadline for filing federal income taxes, gathered people from across the area, all hoping to get their voices heard.

“We’re angry,” said Shawnee resident Jani Neugebauer. “We feel like all those up in Washington aren’t listening to the people. They just do what they want.”

Neugebauer said she expected taxes to continue to increase and attended the rally to show her support for less government involvement in individual lives.

“What better way to show you’re angry then on tax day?” she said. “I hope we get people to stand up and be heard. It does make a difference.”

John Magee, of Overland Park, said the idea that roughly 47 percent of Americans were not paying taxes and the other 53 percent were expected to pick up the slack brought him to the tea party rally.

“I’m tired of it. This is about taxation,” Magee said about the rally.

Using a story about an ant working hard all summer to collect food for winter and then having to bail out a caterpillar who wasted the summer being lazy and eating, Magee illustrated his frustrations with people he feels take advantage of government handouts gathered from his taxes.

“If we keep giving, they will keep taking,” he said.

As many rally participants wandered the ballpark concourse visiting tables set up by various related organizations, other people sat in the stands listening to government officials speak their mind about the issue.

Some of the first people up to the microphone were a group of candidates vying for the seat of Kansas’ 3rd Congressional District, currently held by Democratic Rep. Dennis Moore, who is not seeking re-election.

“This current tax system is flawed,” said John Rysavy. “Right now government is picking the winners and losers in society.”

Rysavy said April 15 should be just another day and that those attending the rally were clearly saying that they’ve had enough.

Nick Jordan, who ran against Moore in 2008, said his goal was to find ways to cut taxes.

“We’ve got to stop the spending,” he said. “We’ve got to stop the tax increases.”

Candidate Kevin Yoder said the tax code needed to be simplified. With 70,000 pages, Yoder said the current tax system has people “over-taxed and over-burdened.”

“I am hearing you loud and clear today,” Yoder said, “but it’s time Washington heard you.”

Comments

greyghost 4 years ago

Obama has kept in place Bush's tax cuts. Where were these tea-baggers two years ago?

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straightforward 4 years ago

That's not exactly true Greyghost. The tax cuts are still in place because they weren't set to expire until later this year. Yes, he could have repealed them but he hasn't specifically taken any action to keep them in place. In fact, his 2011 budget ends the tax cuts for families making $250,000.

Judging by your derogatory use of the term tea-bagger, I'm sure you're probably in favor of taxing "the rich" at higher rates. Just keep in mind that the rich are the ones who create most the jobs we are so in need of right now. I don't know many poor people who create jobs.

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greyghost 4 years ago

I see the anti-Obama signs and read the words about how the tax-system is flawed, BUT, I don't remember these rallies at all during the last nine years. That's all I'm saying. I didn't mean to put myself out there for you to make generalizations about.

Just imagine where we might be if we didn't have to finance an unprovoked war AND everyone paid their fair share in taxes to support our country.

Yes, Bush's tax cuts expire 12/31/2010 and will default back to Clinton's. Maybe we'll see another surplus in a few years.

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straightforward 4 years ago

I agree that we shouldn't still be in Iraq (or maybe never should have been to begin with) but there are many things the federal government is paying for that it shouldn't be such as farm subsidies, public education and corporate bailouts.

On the flip side, our tax code is so warped that nearly half of all Americans won't pay any federal income taxes this year. We have progressive tax rates so the poor don't have to pay as much but they should still have to pay something. Everyone should be invested in the system or else they are voting themselves raises at the expense of those who do pay the taxes. These Americans protesting yesterday realize this trend is not sustainable and when they speak up to say so, they are insulted.

Given the massive debt from Bush and Obama, I think it will be many, many years before we see another surplus. I wasn't a huge fan of Clinton but I will give him credit for maintaining a balanced budget. However, it will take much more than just returning to pre-Bush tax levels. We need to scale back spending more than most politicians on either side of the aisle are willing to.

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Torch 3 years, 12 months ago

It's for the children!

Raise taxes!

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greyghost 3 years, 12 months ago

Anyone seen Capitalism: A Love Story? Check it.......it's worthwhile.

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NanCrisp 3 years, 12 months ago

As I've said long before this, everyone needs to brace for tax increases. There is no way that it can be avoided. I've also expended a lot of words trying to compel organizations and supporters of this and that to pinch every possible penny. This Has To Be A Concerted And Cooperative Effort All The Way Around. Now is not the time to rally on the capitol steps to try to save this and that from funding cuts. Now is not the time to rally on the capitol steps to try to save irresponsible tax cuts or rail against the coming tax increases.

Pitch in and give some things up. A lot of people are giving up a lot of things already and are going to have to continue that for a long time to come. Live well below your means and you will have less problems adding some extra costs into your budget when your state or federal hand-outs get cut. Live well below your means and you will have less problems adding extra for new types of taxes.

Give up the notion that "someone else" out there who is richer than you is going to pony up and save the rest of us. Not happening. As straightforward has noted, 50% of Americans are currently not having to pay federal income tax at all. Economics 101 works well in the income tax scenario: You can meet the federal budget by taxing a few people a lot, or you can tax a lot of people a little. If you choose to put big taxes on the few, you risk them leaving the system one way or another and leaving you high and dry. If you choose to tax the many, even if some manage to avoid the taxes, you have a very, very large pool to draw from.

Just as retailers often choose to go with high volume/low price, that's what our state and federal governments also will end up doing in the long run. The many will be taxed in small increments here and there. You may be able to avoid some of these taxes by buying less at the store or not buying certain items. Your taxes are going up - your buying power is going down - Wall Street and Koch Industries will not change - no matter what any politician tries to tell you. Take off the rose-colored glasses, put down the picket signs and plan for reality.

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