Archive for Thursday, June 28, 2007

Also from June 28

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BHS boys enjoy Creighton camp
June 28, 2007
Sudden death overtime is common in several sports. Not basketball. However, members of the Baldwin High School boys’ basketball team experienced their first sudden death overtime on the court last weekend.
Fireworks to grace sky once again … donations needed
June 28, 2007
Plans are falling together nicely for the community-wide fireworks display July Fourth. Fundraising still isn’t. “First, I’d like to thank everyone who has already made a donation,” said Sheri Caldwell, who is heading up the effort by the group Community Fireworks Display which took over this year from the Citizens for Baldwin City which had run it in the past.
Census shows city has grown again
June 28, 2007
Yes, Baldwin City, you’re still growing. The latest numbers from the U.S. Census Bureau shows the city has grown 3 percent in the last year.
Board grants raises
June 28, 2007
It’s official. The Baldwin School District teachers will have a contract and a raise for the 2007-08 school year. The teachers ratified the contract last week before the Baldwin School Board approved the negotiated agreement 7-0 Monday night. The teachers will receive a 6.5 percent salary increase for the upcoming school year.
History lessons end run
June 28, 2007
Baldwin City’s first-ever Chautauqua Days ended Sunday and the week-long flirtation with Kansas history has been deemed a success by local organizers. “I thought it went very well,” said Tony Brown, co-chair of the local effort to bring the Kansas Humanities Council’s state-wide event here.
Streetscape sends fire trucks northbound
June 28, 2007
Until further notice, the Baldwin City Fire Department will be responding to calls backward. Well, at least when they leave the fire station. The long-anticipated $1.8 million Downtown Streetscape project finally started about 4 p.m. Tuesday when crews from Bryant and Bryant construction firm began ripping up the sidewalk in front of Vaughncraft at Sixth and High streets. They are replacing a waterline that goes west from there through downtown Baldwin City as the first leg in the project.
Youths make history come alive
June 28, 2007
Although the adults were the highlight of the Chautauqua Days, the children gave their best effort to portray famous Baldwin City figures Friday night. A group of 11 local children dressed up and acted as if they were their character in front of the audience Friday. Their performances impressed Ann Birney, Ride into History co-worker, who helped the Youth Chautauquans. “I thought they did a really fine job,” Birney said. “I was very impressed. I really was.” The children also enjoyed performing on stage in front of nearly 100 spectators. “It was fun, but it got a little hot with all of these heavy clothes on,” Austin Kraus said. “I was a bit nervous at first, but I got used to it.”
Personal records broken at summer meet
June 28, 2007
Several Baldwin City competitors went up against area athletes at the Amateur Athletic Union Missouri Valley track and field meet, and had success last weekend. The seven Baldwin youths combined to win five events, finish second three times and place third twice. None of them finished lower than seventh in any event.
School board approves retirement plan, other items
June 28, 2007
Classified employees in the Baldwin School District now have a package to assist them in retirement. On Monday night the Board of Education discussed and approved several items on the agenda. One of those was the classified retirement proposal, which passed unanimously.
Craig, Zordel land on All-State teams
June 28, 2007
Baldwin High School senior-to-be Callie Craig and junior-to-be Alex Zordel were selected for the Kansas Softball Coaches Association Class 4A All-State teams.
Baldwin Briefs
June 28, 2007
Anita L. McHenry
June 28, 2007
John H. Hess
June 28, 2007
Letter to the Editor
June 28, 2007
Praise for district spending, choices
June 28, 2007
As expected, harvest isn’t bountiful
June 28, 2007
With wheat bringing around $6 a bushel, the highest price in decades, farmers should be rejoicing. Problem is, the wheat crop stinks. That’s farmin’. “Well, that’s what happens,” said Bill Wood, Douglas County extension agent. “Lower yields means higher prices. It’s Economics 101 — supply and demand. When supply is low, prices go up.”